I Walked With a Zombie (1943) – Episode 42

Christine Gordon - I Walked With a Zombie (1943)

I Walked With a Zombie (1943) is based on Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. This is a well-acted zombie movie with a lot of folklore included. Rough Script I Walked With a Zombie (1943) Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follows the links to social media in the podcast show notes. Today is the second of our October 2015 horror movies. Episode 42 I Walked with a Zombie (1943) is a classic zombie film when measured on any scale. Producer Val Lewton didn’t like the ending of the Inez Wallace optioned story “I Walked With a Zombie” believing it to be clichéd. Lewton adapted to script to the story Jane Erye by Charlotte Brontë. The legal disclaimer for the film states: “The characters and events depicted in this photoplay are fictional. Any similarity to actual persons, living, dead, or possessed, is purely coincidental.” With that, I will jump right into the characters. James Ellison was cast in…

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Zombies on Broadway (1945) – Episode 41

Zombies on Broadway (1945)

Zombies on Broadway (1945) is a tongue in cheek comedy that is way out of date. However, it features Bela Lugosi and zombies so it must be watched. Rough Script – Zombies on Broadway (1945) Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follows the links to social media in the podcast show notes. Today we are looking at first of our 2015 horror movies. Episode 41 – Zombies on Broadway (1945) is a comedy. Surprise. I have the feeling that this episode will be way on the short side. This movie ain’t about much. It does have some serious racial stereotyping. However, it has a few stars and a couple of actors that will show up in future podcasts. So let jump right in and start going over the comic talent. Wally Brown and Alan Carney were a movie comedy duo that was active from 1943-1946. Brown stayed a bit player in movies while Carney had a few…

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The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) – Episode 21

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) is a Hammer Production is a sequel to the Curse of Frankenstein (1957). Peter Cushing is good in the low horror horror-flick. Rough Script Welcome to Episode 21 The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958). This movie puts us on the Lionel Jeffries line for a bit. Well, I have to tell you this movie wasn’t about much. It lagged and dragged from the beginning and seems to have never had the power to scare. But I will endeavor to preserver. Did you get that Josie Wales reference? This movie is a sequel to The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) which was a reboot of the original story by Mary Shelley. The film was shot in a studio following Dracula (1958). This movie also starred Peter Cushing and had the same director. The scenes and props were repurposed for both movies. Sir Peter Cushing played Dr. Victor Frankenstein in three different incarnations. Given the caliber of this actor, I expected more. Cushing is an English actor that was…

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White Zombie (1932) – Episode 20

Bela Lugosi in White Zombie (1932)

White Zombie (1932) is an amazing black and white horror classic. Bela Lugosi is phenomenal as “Murder” the lord of the zombies. This is one film you do not want to miss as they weave an interesting tale around zombie lore in Haiti. Rough Script White Zombie (1932) Believe it or not this was the first time I have ever seen White Zombie (1932) and all I can say is why did I wait so long. As far as I’m concerned this is right up there with Dracula and Frankenstein. The movie was not received well when it was first released but has gained in popularity since its’ rediscovery in the 1960s. The band White Zombie was named for this movie. This film was originally shot in 11 days. Bela Lugosi always regretted that he was only paid $500 for this role. Lugosi is amazing with his pointed widow’s peak, very bushy eyebrows, a split mustache, and a goatee. He uses his Dracula stare to great effect in this movie. They…

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Billy the Kidd Versus Dracula (1966) – Episode 12

Billy the Kidd Versus Dracula (1966)

Remember that I mention stuntman Chuck Courtney in The Green Berets (1968), well here’s why. Today’s film is one of those film titles that just make you say wow. Billy the Kid Versus Dracula (1966). Unfortunately this episode may be a little short due to the limited star power in this film. Other than John Carradine, who I could talk about for days, Mrs. Folgers, and a few cameos there is not much to say. John Carradine played the role of Count Dracula / posing as James Underhill. Carradine was the partiarch of the Carradine clan – you know David from Kung Fu and the Kill Bill films and Robert from The Big Red One (1980) and the Nerd films, and Keith from Southern Comfort (1981) and Cowboys & Aliens (2011). John was born in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village in 1906. For a time he worked as painter and sketch artist. He eventually ended up in New Orleans in 1925. Remember Lugosi showed up there in late 1920. I believe this…

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Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943) – Episode 10

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

I wanted to get one more show out in October and boy is it a Duesy. I haven’t seen this movie in a couple of decades but man does it age well. This movie not only closes the October 2014 Frankenstein line, it intersects with the Patric Knowles line and puts us back on course for mid-November. Today’s film is Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943). Lon Chaney, Jr. played the role of Lawrence Talbot and the Wolf Man. I don’t know if Chaney Jr. was the greatest actor ever or that was real pain that he shows in every scene. Chaney was the son of legendary actor Lon Chaney, of such films as The Phantom of the Opera (1925), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) and about another 160 movies. Juniors is perhaps best known for playing the role of Lennie in Of Mice and Men (1939). Patric Knowles played Dr. Mannering. Knowles has 127 credits from 1932 to 1973. Knowles was cast as Frank Andrews in The Wolf…

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Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Episode 9

Boris Karloff on set taking a tea and toast break

Son of Frankenstein (1939) had some of the biggest stars of their time – Basil Rathbone, Bela Lugosi, and Boris Karloff. Son of Frankenstein (1939) Hello, today we are going to continue with the October 2014 Frankenstein line. Today’s film is Son of Frankenstein (1939). It is the last of the three Universal Pictures Frankenstein’s and in many ways may be the best of the three. Basil Rathbone was a much better actor than many of the others cast in this role. Bela Lugosi was amazing as Ygor both frightening and enthralling. His hands did half of his acting. Also, Karloff was able to spend more time upright as the monster and showed more of his range of emotions. They covered many of the problems like the exploding castle but fell short on the forgiveness of Dr. F. Today’s first character is Basil Rathbone who played Baron Wolf von Frankenstein the son of Henry. Rathbone was born in South Africa, in 1892, but left as a forthcoming Boer War. In…

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Bride of Frankenstein (1935) – Episode 7

Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

  Today I am continuing with the second of the Franks which I believe to be the greatest of the three films made in the 1930s. The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) introduced us to the lighting haired mate of the monster and many other elements that will be clear to any fan of Young Frankenstein (1974). The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) was directed by James Whale. Whale was born in England and began producing plays while he was in a German POW camp during WWI. Whale had 23 directing credits including The Man in the Iron Mask (1939), Show Boat (1936),  The Invisible Man (1933), Frankenstein (1931), Hell’s Angels (1930) (uncredited) working with Howard Hughes. A great quote of Whales is “A director must be pretty bad if he can’t get a thrill out of war, murder, robbery.” Actors The first actor that will discuss is Boris Karloff. Boris Karloff who was billed in this movie as just Karloff. I don’t think I will get much argument if I say he was the greatest Frank…

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The Wolf Man (1941) – Episode 6

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

  To get back to this classic horror flick I am creating a new line from Patric Knowles who was in Chisum (1970) to The Wolf Man (1941). There are a few biggies down this line that I want to get to. Even a man who is pure at heart, and says his prayers by night, may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the autumn moon is bright. Even a man who is pure at heart, and says his prayers by night, may become a wolf when the wolfbane… Click To Tweet This beautiful little poem recited several times in The Wolf Man (1941) is said to have Eastern European folk roots. However, Curt Siodmak wrote it for this film and has joined the werewolf lore along with many other elements from this movie. The poem, be it somewhat change was quoted in Van Helsing (2004) as well as in every Universal film Wolf Man appearances. I’m going to Patric Knowles line from Chisum (1970) to get to this movie.…

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King Kong (1933) – 1

King Kong (1933)

  For my first movie review, I am taking on the king of them all – King Kong (1933). This is the king, see what I did there, of all monster movies and set the bar for what was to come. This movie used innovative techniques such as glass paintings, miniature sets, rear projection, traveling mattes, full-scale articulated creatures, and stop-motion photography to layer the action.[1] [2] [3] When this movie was shown in 1933, the audiences had never seen anything like it. This movie has been remade many times, 1976, 2005, 2017, and many variations of the story. Although some are visually striking, none has matched the original. If I say King Kong and you think of the 1976 or the 2005 version, or even the 2017 version, you clearly have never seen a good copy of the 1933 version. I’m talking about the 1933 real King Kong, the one with bi-planes and Fay Wray. This is an American-made film in the monster/adventure genre. It was never nominated for…

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