The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) – Episode 21

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) is a Hammer Production is a sequel to the Curse of Frankenstein (1957). Peter Cushing is good in the low horror horror-flick.

Rough Script

Welcome to Episode 21 The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958). This movie puts us on the Lionel Jeffries line for a bit. Well, I have to tell you this movie wasn’t about much. It lagged and dragged from the beginning and seems to have never had the power to scare. But I will endeavor to preserver. Did you get that Josie Wales reference?

This movie is a sequel to The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) which was a reboot of the original story by Mary Shelley. The film was shot in a studio following Dracula (1958). This movie also starred Peter Cushing and had the same director. The scenes and props were repurposed for both movies.

Sir Peter Cushing played Dr. Victor Frankenstein in three different incarnations. Given the caliber of this actor, I expected more. Cushing is an English actor …

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White Zombie (1932) – Episode 20

Bela Lugosi in White Zombie (1932)

White Zombie (1932) is an amazing black and white horror classic. Bela Lugosi is phenomenal as “Murder” the lord of the zombies. This is one film you do not want to miss as they weave an interesting tale around zombie lore in Haiti.

Rough Script White Zombie (1932)

Believe it or not this was the first time I have ever seen White Zombie (1932) and all I can say is why did I wait so long. As far as I’m concerned this is right up there with Dracula and Frankenstein. The movie was not received well when it was first released but has gained in popularity since its’ rediscovery in the 1960s. The band White Zombie was named for this movie.

This film was originally shot in 11 days. Bela Lugosi always regretted that he was only paid $500 for this role.

Lugosi is amazing with his pointed widow’s peak, very bushy eyebrows, a split mustache, and a goatee. He uses his Dracula stare to great effect in this movie. They …

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The Cowboys (1972) – Episode 19

The Cowboys (1972)

The Cowboys (1972) is a wonderful John Wayne saga where he hires school boys as cowboys to drive his herd to market. It is a coming of age story as the boys learn about life and death from Wayne and Roscoe Lee Browne as they grow into manhood.

Rough Script The Cowboys (1972)

Well the great actor John Wayne played the lead role of Wil Andersen. I have spoken about Wayne extensively in other podcasts so I won’t go into that again.

Roscoe Lee Browne played the role of trail cook Jeb/Jebediah Nightlinger. Browne earned a masters degree and began teach French and comparative literature. In 1951, he won the world championship in the 800-yard dash. This lead to a change in profession and in 1956 the decision to become an actor. With no training his voice and presence lead to a role in the newly formed New York Shakespeare Festival.

He began working on and off Broadway until 1966 when he left the theater until 1983. By …

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The Vikings (1958) – Episode 18

The Vikings (1958)

Welcome to Episode 18 – The Vikings (1958). We are currently working on the Janet Leigh line. Go to my website at snarkymoviereviews.com to find all of the twitter, Facebook, and other social media links. If you like what you hear pop on over to iTunes and give me a review.

This movie is a nice little period piece but it’s a little strange in the treatment of the women characters. The story is interesting and has enough twists and turns. The on-location shooting is visibly striking and the actors are some of the top in the business.

The role of Ragnor was played by Ernest Borgnine. Borgnine was the child of Italian immigrants. After graduating from high school in Connecticut Borgnine joined the Navy. He stayed in the service for 10 years leaving at the end of WWII. His mother suggested that he try acting and well, you should always listen to mamma. His first role was as a male nurse in Harvey (1950). He moved to …

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Hard Times (1975) – Episode 17

Charles Bronson in Hard Times (1975)

Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as a bare-knuckle fighter in New Orleans during the Great Depression. This movie also features James Coburn and Strother Martin in what may be his strongest role.

Rough Script

Welcome to Episode 17. Continuing on the

Strother Martin line today’s subject is the 1975 movie Hard Times (1975).

Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as Chaney a tuff as nails fighter with no background and very few words. In this entire movie, Bronson only speaks about 500 words. Bronson was around 53 when he took this role. The producers wanted a younger man and Jan-Michael Vincent was considered. However, Bronson was perfect for the role and was in great shape.

Bronson was born in Pennsylvania to Lithuanian parents. As a result of his upbringing he could speak several languages fluently. He also worked in the coal mines where he was in a tunnel collapse resulting in a lifelong fear of closed spaces. This fear and his languages were integrated into his …

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Night of the Lepus (1972) – Episode 16

Night of the Lepus (1972)

Well, its spring time down south so I thought a little bunny fun might be appropriate. I am going to start a new line from Paul Fix in The Undefeated (1969). Today’s film is the wonderfully bad Night of the Lepus 1972. Lepus is the genus for hares and jackrabbits and includes rabbits. In this cautionary ecological tale, human actions lead to the growth of king sized mutant rabbits.

The original movie poster had giant glowing eyes rather than pictures of rabbits as the producers did not think people would take the movie seriously as a science-fiction movie if they saw bunnies too early. However, the studio still considered calling the movie Rabbits. That really invokes fear.
What is more amazing about this movie than the subject matter is the number of big stars that were cast.

Stuart Whitman … Roy Bennett
Whitman spent three years in the US Army Corp of Engineers during the post-World War II era. While in the Army he won 32 …

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The Undefeated (1969) – Episode 15

The Undefeated (1969)

Well, this is a manly-manly movie with lots of horses and good ole fashion American justice. Following the original Bruce Cabot line from King Kong (1933) we now arrive at The Undefeated 1969. This movie was originally billed as having the most horses ever used in a movie with 2500. According to thehorse.com the movie was filmed in Durango, Mexico, and the horses were rented from local villagers so an accurate count is not possible. The hooves were branded to identify ownership.

This movie had a lot of star power including most of the traditional John Wayne posse.

Of course, the biggest star in this movie was John Wayne. Wayne who never served in the military was cast in the role of Union cavalry officer Col.

John Henry Thomas. Like the other 1969 movie, Wayne was a little old and a lot heavy for this part. The name John Henry Thomas seems to be based on George Henry Thomas who was known as the Rock of Chickamauga where …

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Band of Angels (1957) – Episode 14

Band of Angels (1957)

Band of Angels 1957 is a quite enjoyable Civil War yarn with Clark Gable, Yvonne De Carlo, Sidney Poitier.

Band of Angels (1957) Rough Script

I’m continuing on the Patric Knowles lines that I first picked-up in Episode 2 –Chisum (1970). I was a little surprised when I dived into the credits and found our old friend Bob Steele first noted in the Burgess Meredith line from Of Mice and Men 1939.

I usually don’t spend a lot of time on directors but icons like Raoul Walsh deserve a little extra. Walsh was born in New York and started on the stage there. He quickly moved into film work. In 1914, he was an assistant to D.W. Griffith while they made The Life of General Villa. The film was shot in Mexico and starred the real revolutionary Poncho Villa in the lead. The film which is lost contained actual battle scenes. A 2003 movie title And Starring Poncho Villa as Himself recreates the filming process and …

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Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (1964) – Episode 13

Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (1964)

Ho ho Ho Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Kicking Kwanza, and Festivus for the rest of us. As a special Christmas treat, I have put together a podcast about the fantastically bad Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (1964). I hope everyone of all faiths and denominations as well as those that lack either will enjoy.

Before I get into this too deeply I need to make a couple of notes. First, this movie is in the public domain so you get slightly different versions each time you view it. So don’t be too put off if the summary does not match scene for scene. Secondly, it is pretty hard to review that the actors in the film when about 80 percent of their bios state in the first line that they are best known for this stinker of a movie. But I will Endeavor to Preserver. Movie line. Did you get it?

It seems that scavenged whomever they could get that was working on Broadway and hustled them over to an …

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Billy the Kidd Versus Dracula (1966) – Episode 12

Billy the Kidd Versus Dracula (1966)

Remember that I mention stuntman Chuck Courtney in The Green Berets (1968), well here’s why. Today’s film is one of those film titles that just make you say wow. Billy the Kid Versus Dracula (1966). Unfortunately this episode may be a little short due to the limited star power in this film. Other than John Carradine, who I could talk about for days, Mrs. Folgers, and a few cameos there is not much to say.

John Carradine played the role of Count Dracula / posing as James Underhill. Carradine was the partiarch of the Carradine clan – you know David from Kung Fu and the Kill Bill films and Robert from The Big Red One (1980) and the Nerd films, and Keith from Southern Comfort (1981) and Cowboys & Aliens (2011).

John was born in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village in 1906. For a time he worked as painter and sketch artist. He eventually ended up in New Orleans in 1925. Remember Lugosi showed up there in late 1920. I believe …

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The Green Berets (1968) – Episode 11

green beret

The Green Berets (1968) is often listed as one of the worst war movies ever. The Green Berets (1968) is presented as a belated Veteran’s Day tribute. This movie stars John Wayne and many from his cast of regular players.

I apologize late with this Veteran’s day tribute. Hopefully, this will be out before Thanksgiving. I will endeavor in the future to be more temporally appropriate.

Although this movie is very popular and made a lot of money it is considered by man to be one of the worst war movies ever made. Once the film was released popular movie critic Roger Ebert gave it zero stars and cited the extensive use of cliches, depicting the war in terms of “cowboys and Indians”, and being a “heavy-handed, remarkably old-fashioned film.” It is on his “Most Hated” list.

In The New York Times, Renata Adler wrote, “It is vile and insane. On top of that, it is dull.” Oliver Stone’s acclaimed anti-war film Platoon was written …

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Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943) – Episode 10

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

I wanted to get one more show out in October and boy is it a Duesy. I haven’t seen this movie in a couple of decades but man does it age well. This movie not only closes the October 2014 Frankenstein line, it intersects with the Patric Knowles line and puts us back on course for mid-November. Today’s film is Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943).

Lon Chaney, Jr. played the role of Lawrence Talbot and the Wolf Man. I don’t know if Chaney Jr. was the greatest actor ever or that was real pain that he shows in every scene. Chaney was the son of legendary actor Lon Chaney, of such films as The Phantom of the Opera (1925), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) and about another 160 movies. Juniors is perhaps best known for playing the role of Lennie in Of Mice and Men (1939).

Patric Knowles played Dr. Mannering. Knowles has 127 credits from 1932 to 1973. Knowles was cast as Frank Andrews in Continue reading

Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Episode 9

Boris Karloff on set taking a tea and toast break

Son of Frankenstein (1939) had some of the biggest stars of their time – Basil Rathbone, Bela Lugosi, and Boris Karloff.

Son of Frankenstein (1939)

Hello, today we are going to continue with the October 2014 Frankenstein line. Today’s film is Son of Frankenstein (1939). It is the last of the three Universal Pictures Frankenstein’s and in many ways may be the best of the three. Basil Rathbone was a much better actor than many of the others cast in this role. Bela Lugosi was amazing as Ygor both frightening and enthralling. His hands did half of his acting. Also, Karloff was able to spend more time upright as the monster and showed more of his range of emotions. They covered many of the problems like the exploding castle but fell short on the forgiveness of Dr. F.

Today’s first character is Basil Rathbone who played Baron Wolf von Frankenstein the son of Henry. Rathbone was born in South Africa, in 1892, but left as …

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