The Long Ships (1964) – Episode 23

The Long Ships (1964)

Welcome to Episode 22 – The Long Ships (1964). We are still following the Lionel Jeffries line. This movie is about Vikings so I love it no matter what. With big stars such as Richard Widmark and Sidney Poitier, it’s hard to go wrong. But they did seem to go wrong a great deal. Poitier said, “To say it was disastrous is a compliment.” Richard Widmark played the role of Viking Rolfe, son of Krok. He was really too old for this role and turned it down a few times. He finally agreed when that cast his good friend Sidney Poitier. Widmark has always fascinated me as an actor. He burst into movies playing angry and psychotic anti-heroes. However, in all of his roles, he seemed like he was cranked off. Is this good acting or was he really a mean guy? Widmark was born in Minnesota and always had an interest in movies. Like so many, he attended college to become a lawyer but he was derailed by the…

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Clint Eastwood – Rowdy Yates to Unforgiven

Clint Eastwood

Clint Eastwood was born in California in 1930. He got his start in the movies as an uncredited actor in Revenge of the Creature (1955). His big breakthrough came out when he got a role as Rowdy Yates in 1959. Eastwood made three movies in Italy that kicked his career into high gear. These movies dubbed as spaghetti westerns are; A Fistful of Dollars (1964), For a Few Dollars More (1965), and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966). These westerns allowed Eastwood to take his tough guy act to bigger audiences. He made more westerns including the musical Paint Your Wagon (1969). He also made a few WWII movies with some of the bigger stars of the time. Beginning in 1971 he began directing and taking full leading men roles such as The Beguiled and Play Misty for Me. This was also the beginning of the Dirty Harry film series – go ahead make my day punk. He continued to make movies through the 70s but High Plains Drifter (1973)…

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First Men in the Moon (1964) – Episode 22

First Men on the Moon (1964)

First Men in the Moon (1964) is a wonderful sci-fi movie based on a H.G. Wells story. The master Ray Harryhausen did the effects for this movie and it should not be missed. Rough Script First Men in the Moon (1964) Welcome to Episode 22 First Men in the Moon (1964). We are following the Lionel Jeffries line from The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958). This is a great movie based on an H.G. Wells story. This movie was very enjoyable mostly because of Lionel Jeffries. I also learned that H.G. Wells is a hack but more about that later. Edward Judd was the star of the movie playing Arnold Bedford but Jeffries stole all of the scenes he was in. Judd is an English actor that started stage work when he was a teenager. By 16 he made his film debut in The Hideout (1948). He made numerous movies through the 1960s that include: Sink the Bismark (1960), The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961), The Long Ships (1964), and Invasion…

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The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) – Episode 21

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) is a Hammer Production is a sequel to the Curse of Frankenstein (1957). Peter Cushing is good in the low horror horror-flick. Rough Script Welcome to Episode 21 The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958). This movie puts us on the Lionel Jeffries line for a bit. Well, I have to tell you this movie wasn’t about much. It lagged and dragged from the beginning and seems to have never had the power to scare. But I will endeavor to preserver. Did you get that Josie Wales reference? This movie is a sequel to The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) which was a reboot of the original story by Mary Shelley. The film was shot in a studio following Dracula (1958). This movie also starred Peter Cushing and had the same director. The scenes and props were repurposed for both movies. Sir Peter Cushing played Dr. Victor Frankenstein in three different incarnations. Given the caliber of this actor, I expected more. Cushing is an English actor that was…

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White Zombie (1932) – Episode 20

Bela Lugosi in White Zombie (1932)

White Zombie (1932) is an amazing black and white horror classic. Bela Lugosi is phenomenal as “Murder” the lord of the zombies. This is one film you do not want to miss as they weave an interesting tale around zombie lore in Haiti. Rough Script White Zombie (1932) Believe it or not this was the first time I have ever seen White Zombie (1932) and all I can say is why did I wait so long. As far as I’m concerned this is right up there with Dracula and Frankenstein. The movie was not received well when it was first released but has gained in popularity since its’ rediscovery in the 1960s. The band White Zombie was named for this movie. This film was originally shot in 11 days. Bela Lugosi always regretted that he was only paid $500 for this role. Lugosi is amazing with his pointed widow’s peak, very bushy eyebrows, a split mustache, and a goatee. He uses his Dracula stare to great effect in this movie. They…

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The Cowboys (1972) – Episode 19

The Cowboys (1972)

The Cowboys (1972) is a wonderful John Wayne saga where he hires school boys as cowboys to drive his herd to market. It is a coming of age story as the boys learn about life and death from Wayne and Roscoe Lee Browne as they grow into manhood. Rough Script The Cowboys (1972) Well the great actor John Wayne played the lead role of Wil Andersen. I have spoken about Wayne extensively in other podcasts so I won’t go into that again. Roscoe Lee Browne played the role of trail cook Jeb/Jebediah Nightlinger. Browne earned a masters degree and began teach French and comparative literature. In 1951, he won the world championship in the 800-yard dash. This lead to a change in profession and in 1956 the decision to become an actor. With no training his voice and presence lead to a role in the newly formed New York Shakespeare Festival. He began working on and off Broadway until 1966 when he left the theater until 1983. By the end…

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Pancho Barnes & The Right Stuff 1983

Pancho Barnes and The Right Stuff (1983)

Pancho Barnes and The Right Stuff (1983) are linked forever. Pancho Barnes was an early aviation pioneer. Learn how she was portrayed in The Right Stuff (1983). Rough Script If you are a fan on The Right Stuff (1983), and quite frankly, who isn’t, you are familiar with the scenes set at The Happy Bottom Riding Club. In the movie the Riding Club is a rat hole bar and the owner Pancho only has a few lines. The movie shows the Edwards Air Force base pilots celebrating their exploits at the club. This was indeed what they did but the reason they did so is extremely interesting. The reason they enjoyed their time at the club was because they could talk Pancho about aviation because she was in fact one of the pioneers. Pancho Barnes and The Happy Bottom Riding Club [The Right Stuff (1983)] Click To Tweet Pancho as we now know her was born Florence Lowe to a wealthy San Marino, California. Her grandfather was one of the…

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Charles Bronson Bio

Charles Bronson in Hard Times (1975)

Charles Bronson was born in Pennsylvania to Lithuanian parents. As a result of his up bringing he could speak several languages fluently. He also worked in the coal mines where he was in a tunnel collapse resulting in a lifelong fear of closed spaces. This fear and his languages were integrated into his roles in The Great Escape (1963) and The Dirty Dozen (1967). In 1943, Bronson joined the US Army Air Corp as an aerial gunner. He flew 25 combat mission before attending college on the GI Bill studying art. He was recommended to a director by one of art professor and debut in You’re in the Navy Now (1951). Until the early 60s he was given a lot of roles where he could show off his muscles by going shirtless. His biggest break came when he was cast as a half Mexican/half Irish gunfighter Bernardo O’Reilly in The Magnificent Seven (1960). This was followed by the role of Danny Velinski, a tunnel rat in the start studded The…

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The Vikings (1958) – Episode 18

The Vikings (1958)

Welcome to Episode 18 – The Vikings (1958). We are currently working on the Janet Leigh line. Go to my website at snarkymoviereviews.com to find all of the twitter, Facebook, and other social media links. If you like what you hear pop on over to iTunes and give me a review. This movie is a nice little period piece but it’s a little strange in the treatment of the women characters. The story is interesting and has enough twists and turns. The on-location shooting is visibly striking and the actors are some of the top in the business. The role of Ragnor was played by Ernest Borgnine. Borgnine was the child of Italian immigrants. After graduating from high school in Connecticut Borgnine joined the Navy. He stayed in the service for 10 years leaving at the end of WWII. His mother suggested that he try acting and well, you should always listen to mamma. His first role was as a male nurse in Harvey (1950). He moved to Hollywood and…

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NMM 3 – The Vikings

Viking Fest Helmet logo

Nantan Movie Minute 3 – The Vikings. A couple of classic Viking movies – The Long Ships (1964) and The Vikings (1959). Vikings – A word that sets off a sense of wonderment in the imagination of any true American. They were possibly the first Europeans to visit North America. Vikings are resurging in popular culture with the success of the History Channel’s Vikings. This TV shows follows Ragner Lothbrook on his adventures. However, there are a couple of classic movies that cover the same subject with interesting twists. The first of these is The Long Ships (1964). The Long Ships cast Richard Widmark as hard charging Viking Rolfe in an epic struggle with Sidney Poitier as a Moor. Both men want to obtain the Mother of All Voices, a solid golden bell that is located in the Pillars of Hercules, today known as the Straits of Gibraltar. They go on their quest with Russ Tamblyn along as Orm. Russ adds excitement with his acrobatic moves. You may remember Russ from Westside…

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Jan-Michael Vincent Bio

Jan-Michael Vincent

Jan-Michael Vincent was born in Colorado near the end of World War II but he was raised in California. He was in the National Guard when he was discovered by a talent scout that was struck by his good looks. He first appeared on-screen in The Hardy Boys: The Mystery of the Chinese Junk (1967). This was followed by Journey to Shiloh (1968) and then on “Danger Island” a Hanna-Barbera Saturday morning TV show that was part of “The Banana Splits Adventure Hour” 1968. Vincent was a handsome young actor that was a force to be reckoned with from the 1970-1980s. However, his star power seemed to wane as quickly as it rose. He was often cast as a lone force fighting the system. He worked in movies such as The Undefeated (1969) with John Wayne and Rock Hudson. In Tribes (1970) where he played a young Marine recruit in conflict with his drill instructor. In White Line Fever (1975) he took on a corrupt trucking company with Slim Pickens. One of his finest…

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Hard Times (1975) – Episode 17

Charles Bronson in Hard Times (1975)

Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as a bare-knuckle fighter in New Orleans during the Great Depression. This movie also features James Coburn and Strother Martin in what may be his strongest role. Welcome to Episode 17. Continuing on the Strother Martin line today’s subject is the 1975 movie Hard Times (1975). Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as Chaney a tuff as nails fighter with no background and very few words. In this entire movie, Bronson only speaks about 500 words. Bronson was around 53 when he took this role. The producers wanted a younger man and Jan-Michael Vincent was considered. However, Bronson was perfect for the role and was in great shape. Bronson was born in Pennsylvania to Lithuanian parents. As a result of his upbringing, he could speak several languages fluently. He also worked in the coal mines where he was in a tunnel collapse resulting in a lifelong fear of closed spaces. This fear and his languages were integrated into his roles in The Great Escape…

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Night of the Lepus (1972) – Episode 16

Night of the Lepus (1972)

Well, its spring time down south so I thought a little bunny fun might be appropriate. I am going to start a new line from Paul Fix in The Undefeated (1969). Today’s film is the wonderfully bad Night of the Lepus 1972. Lepus is the genus for hares and jackrabbits and includes rabbits. In this cautionary ecological tale, human actions lead to the growth of king sized mutant rabbits. The original movie poster had giant glowing eyes rather than pictures of rabbits as the producers did not think people would take the movie seriously as a science-fiction movie if they saw bunnies too early. However, the studio still considered calling the movie Rabbits. That really invokes fear. What is more amazing about this movie than the subject matter is the number of big stars that were cast. Stuart Whitman … Roy Bennett Whitman spent three years in the US Army Corp of Engineers during the post-World War II era. While in the Army he won 32 boxing matches as a…

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