The Mummy’s Curse (1944) – 130

The Mummy’s Curse (1944)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast AKA iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you’re finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Mummy’s Curse (1944). This is the third time that Long Chaney Jr. played the mummy. I wanted to pan this movie like the rest of this mummy series, but I found this one to be vastly superior to the other three. With limited star power, the acting was still very solid. I thought that moving mummy from a swamp in Massachusetts to Louisiana would be ridiculous but the folklore was woven into the story very well. With that said, any of you that have been listening for a while know that English is not my native language. Since I was raised in raise in a third world country known as…

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The Mummy’s Hand (1940) -127

The Mummy’s Hand (1940)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Mummy’s Hand (1940). This movie is sometimes called the sequel to The Mummy (1932). However, it doesn’t as much continue the story, as it uses clips from the earlier film woven into another story to save money. This movie is not too bad as early horror films go. Any movie that has three archeologists can’t be all bad. Of course, one of the three is evil, which I find to be pretty consistent with my life experience. This movie is rated 67% on Rotten Tomatoes.[1] At the time of release, the New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote “Once or twice Miss Moran makes a grimace—as if she had caught an…

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Tower of London (1939) – Episode 85

Tower of London (1939)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. Today’s movie is Tower of London (1939). This movie was set in 15th Century England. It has a great cast featuring Basil Rathbone, Boris Karloff, Vincent Price, and Barbara O’Neil. This movie was made by Universal at the same time RKO was making the Hunchback of Norte Dame. It was one of the hottest years on record and the actors in full costumes suffered immensely. Basil Rathbone plays the role of Richard – Duke of Gloucester. He is bent on killing his way to the English throne. Rathbone was covered in Episode 9 – Son of Frankenstein (1944). Boris Karloff played…

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House of Frankenstein (1944) – Episode 76

House of Frankenstein (1944)

Welcome to today’s show, House of Frankenstein (1944), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. Today’s movie is the campy good House of Frankenstein (1944). This movie brings together so many good actors and the monsters they played it can’t help but be entertaining. Also, this movie has some interesting lore about stake pulling and who can shot you with a silver bullet. ACTORS I’m going to jump right in with the actors were have previously discussed. The greatest of these is the wonderful Boris Karloff played the role of the evil want to be Frankenstein Doctor Gustav Niemann. Karloff was first introduced in Episode 7 – Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Lon Chaney…

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The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) – Episode 70

The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) - Myrna Loy

Welcome to today’s show, The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. Today’s movie is The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932). It features many European actors with taped-backed eyes but I going to go with “that’s how it was done back then” and move on. Boris Karloff and Jean Hersholt were amazing in their roles. Myrna Loy was fantastic playing an evil sex crazed fiend. I used to seeing her in roles like The Thin Man (1934) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). Of course this movie has archeologists which always draws me in. ACTORS Boris Karloff was up to the role of Dr. Fu Manchu…

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Mummy Fest

The Mummy Logo

Welcome to Mummy Fest – A collection of everything I have related to ancient Egyptians walking the Earth. From The Mummy (1911) to The Scorpion King (2008). A History of Classic Monsters: Mummies by John Gaines states that although mummies were created by one of oldest civilizations in history their development into demonic monsters is largely a 20th century construct. Bram Stoker of Dracula fame wrote a story about an evil mummy in “The Jewel of the Seven Stars” 1903. Carl Laemmle Jr. commissioned a plot for a movie based on the opening of King Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922. This became The Mummy (1932) starring Boris Karloff and it set the bar high for all future mummy movies. I have assembled a little list of movies by Universal, Hammer, and others that follow The Mummy (1932) line. They are: The Mummy’s Hand (1940), The Mummy’s Tomb (1942), The Mummy’s Ghost (1944), The Mummy’s Curse (1944), Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955), The Mummy (1959), The Curse of the Mummy’s…

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Boris Karloff – King of the Monsters

Boris Karloff on set taking a tea and toast break

I don’t think I will get much argument if I say that Boris Karloff was the greatest Frankenstein of them all. Although Peter Boyle was pretty good. Karloff was a British actor that began stage work in Canada and then made his way to Hollywood. He made some silent films but had to maintain jobs such as ditch digger to survive. By 1931 Karloff was on his way with The Criminal Code (1931) and Five Star Final (1931), a film that was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Of course, the biggest role of all was that of the monster in Frankenstein (1931). Karloff was about 5 feet 11 inches. The costume that he work for this role had 4-inch platforms and weighed 8 pounds each. Karloff’s costume was designed by Jack Pierce and was copyrighted by Universal Studios making it harder for other studios to copy the success of Frankenstein. Oddly Lon Chaney Sr, father of Wolf Man Lon Chaney Jr. Was offer the role of the…

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The Mummy (1932) – Episode 47

The Mummy Logo

The Mummy (1932) is classic horror from Universal. This movie features Boris Karloff as the mummy and Edward Van Sloan as a professor of the occult. The Mummy (1932) – Rough Script Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follows the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. I am very excited to get to The Mummy (1932). When I watched this for the show I found that Boris Karloff is still scary as Ardath Bey with his deadpan stare and wrinkled skin. So I will jump right in with Boris Karloff. Boris Karloff the king of the movie monster played a dual role or three depending on how you count. In this movie he was the living Im-Ho-Tep, the dead Im-Ho-Tep AKA the mummy, and Ardath Bey the mummy in his seconding life. I covered Karloff pretty well in Episode…

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Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Episode 9

Boris Karloff on set taking a tea and toast break

Son of Frankenstein (1939) had some of the biggest stars of their time – Basil Rathbone, Bela Lugosi, and Boris Karloff. Son of Frankenstein (1939) Hello, today we are going to continue with the October 2014 Frankenstein line. Today’s film is Son of Frankenstein (1939). It is the last of the three Universal Pictures Frankenstein’s and in many ways may be the best of the three. Basil Rathbone was a much better actor than many of the others cast in this role. Bela Lugosi was amazing as Ygor both frightening and enthralling. His hands did half of his acting. Also, Karloff was able to spend more time upright as the monster and showed more of his range of emotions. They covered many of the problems like the exploding castle but fell short on the forgiveness of Dr. F. Today’s first character is Basil Rathbone who played Baron Wolf von Frankenstein the son of Henry. Rathbone was born in South Africa, in 1892, but left as a forthcoming Boer War. In…

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Bride of Frankenstein (1935) – Episode 7

Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

  Today I am continuing with the second of the Franks which I believe to be the greatest of the three films made in the 1930s. The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) introduced us to the lighting haired mate of the monster and many other elements that will be clear to any fan of Young Frankenstein (1974). The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) was directed by James Whale. Whale was born in England and began producing plays while he was in a German POW camp during WWI. Whale had 23 directing credits including The Man in the Iron Mask (1939), Show Boat (1936),  The Invisible Man (1933), Frankenstein (1931), Hell’s Angels (1930) (uncredited) working with Howard Hughes. A great quote of Whales is “A director must be pretty bad if he can’t get a thrill out of war, murder, robbery.” Actors The first actor that will discuss is Boris Karloff. Boris Karloff who was billed in this movie as just Karloff. I don’t think I will get much argument if I say he was the greatest Frank…

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