Dracula’s Daughter (1936) – Episode 87

Dracula's Daughter (1936)

  Welcome to today’s show, Dracula’s Daughter (1936), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. Today’s movie is Dracula’s Daughter (1936). This is a simple little tale that picks up where Dracula and Drácula (1931) ended. This brings up a question that has bothered me for some time. Why did Van Helsing remain behind in the dungeon after he killed Dracula? The simplest explanation would be to set up the sequel. Where they thinking that far ahead? Did they know the impact that Dracula (1931) would have? If so, why wait five years? I think it may have to do with follow-up. It will become clear that I have thought about this too…

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Dracula (1931) and Drácula (1931) – Episode 86

Dracula (1931)

Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. Today’s movie is the classic Universal horror film Dracula (1931). Many of you are probably aware that a Spanish-language version was filmed on the same sets and at the same time as the English-language with Bela Lugosi (1931). They filmed the English-language version during the day and the Spanish-language version was filmed at night. The only difference in title is that the Spanish version has a little mark above the first “a.” In my opinion, the Spanish-language version is vastly superior to the Lugosi film. I realize this is heresy and Bela Lugosi will always be the only vampire for me. They just…

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Bela Lugosi leaves rehab in 1955

Bela Lugosi leaves rehab and talks about his alcohol and drug addiction after leaving rehab in 1955 Bela Lugosi leaves rehab and talks frankly about his struggles with narcotics and alcohol. It is interesting that he doesn’t blame his World War I wound as the source of the pain. Lugosi was injured while an officer in the military of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. I like it when Bela Lugosi refers to Eddy Woods. Lugosi continued to struggle after this and was using narcotics at the time of his death.   Although weighing only 125 pounds and only a shadow of his former self, Lugosi’s voice was clear and resonant as he told the court how shooting pains in his legs led him to start taking morphine injections in 1935. Without morphine, he couldn’t work, Lugosi said. Read more here in the transcript Bela Lugosi Short Biography

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Bela Lugosi – King of the Vampires

Bela Lugosi was born Be’la Ferenc Dezso Blasko in 1882 in Lugos, Austria-Hungary (now Lugoj, Romania). During WWI Lugosi was an infantry lieutenant in the Austro-Hungarian Army. Yes, that is correct, it’s the other side. Since he was active in the Actors Union during the Hungarian Revolution of 1919 he was forced to leave his homeland. For a time he continued to act in Berlin but left for America in 1920. he arrived in New Orleans in December 1920. This makes me wonder, where the rats disappearing on the boat and did he mingle with the Crescent city vampires. After working on the stage for three years he got his first silent screen role in America, he had been in a dozen or so in Hungary. By 1927, he was back on Broadway in the role of “Dracula.” It has always been rumored the Lon Chaney Sr. was the first choice for the role but died before shooting began. There is some controversy with this a Chaney was under contract…

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Billy the Kidd Versus Dracula (1966) – Episode 12

Billy the Kidd Versus Dracula (1966)

Remember that I mention stuntman Chuck Courtney in The Green Berets (1968), well here’s why. Today’s film is one of those film titles that just make you say wow. Billy the Kid Versus Dracula (1966). Unfortunately this episode may be a little short due to the limited star power in this film. Other than John Carradine, who I could talk about for days, Mrs. Folgers, and a few cameos there is not much to say. John Carradine played the role of Count Dracula / posing as James Underhill. Carradine was the partiarch of the Carradine clan – you know David from Kung Fu and the Kill Bill films and Robert from The Big Red One (1980) and the Nerd films, and Keith from Southern Comfort (1981) and Cowboys & Aliens (2011). John was born in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village in 1906. For a time he worked as painter and sketch artist. He eventually ended up in New Orleans in 1925. Remember Lugosi showed up there in late 1920. I believe this…

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