Seven Days in May (1964) – 111

Seven Days in May (1964)

 

Welcome to today’s show, Seven Days in May (1964), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts.

Today’s movie is Seven Days in May (1964). This star-studded military movie doesn’t feature any combat. But there is enough action for anyone, as a rogue general tries to replace the US president in a military coup. Every actor in this movie is amazing but I want to call out Edmond O’Brien who plays a drunken Senator. Rod Serling wrote the screenplay and the movie was directed by John Frankenheimer.

So, let’ jump right into the actors, many of whom of show veterans.

Actors

Returning

Burt Lancaster played Gen. James Mattoon Scott. The great Burt Lancaster was covered in Episode 30 – Birdman of Alcatraz (1962).

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Edmond O’Brien – American Tough Guy

Edmund O'Brian

Edmond O’Brien was born in the Bronx, New York in 1915. O’Brein stated that he learned magic tricks from his neighbor Harry Houdini. He was in the school theater and major in drama a Columbia University. He started on Broadway debut at 21.

He was brought to Hollywood and he was uncredited in his first film – Prison Break (1938). The next year he was in a supporting role as “Gringoire” in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) with Charles Laughton.

He joined the Army Air Force during World War II and returned to a solid career as a supporting actor. By 1950, he was given the lead role in D.O.A. (1950).

O’Brien has roles in other film noir classics such as The Killers (1946) and The Hitch-Hiker (1953)

In 1954, he won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his role in The Barefoot Contessa (1954).

Perhaps one of O’Brien’s greatest performance was as the drunken newspaper editor Dutton Peabody in The Man …

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D.O.A. (1950) – Episode 48

D.O.A. (1950)

D.O.A. (1950) is a classic fast paced film noir with razor sharp dialog. The guys are tough and gals are beautiful. This movie will keep you guessing until the end.

D.O.A. (1950) Rough Script

Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follows the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts.

Today’s movie is D.O.A., not doa (1950). You have to put the periods in your search or you’ll get something else. This is a great film noir classic that is told in flashback format. It has lots of tough guys like Edmond O’Brian and Neville Brand.

Edmond O’Brien plays the lead as Frank Bigelow accountant and notary. He was covered in Episode 30 – Birdman of Alcatraz (1962).

Pamela Britton played the role of Pula Gibson. Britton was born into an acting family. While in college Britton …

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Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) – Episode 30

The Birdman of Alcatraz (1962)

The Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) is a fictionalized tale of Robert Stroud who raised birds while in prison and discovered cures for bird diseases. This movie showcases the amazing talent of Burt Lancaster. Karl Malden is excellent in the supporting role.

Rough Script Birdman of Alcatraz (1962)

Today’s film is the Birdman of Alcatraz (1962). This is a wonderfully inspiring story based on a true story that makes you say “thank god that guy is locked up.” This movie was directed by John Frankenheimer and based on a book by Thomas E. Gaddis.

Of course, the Birdman was brought to life by arguably one of America’s greatest actors – Burt Lancaster. Even that name sounds macho. Lancaster played the role of Robert Stroud a lifer in a couple of different prisons.

Lancaster was born in Manhattan. All four of his grandparents were immigrants from Northern Ireland. Lancaster grew up on the streets and was a tuff character. He became interested in gymnastics and was a high school athlete. Following his …

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