House of Frankenstein (1944) – Episode 76

House of Frankenstein (1944)

Welcome to today’s show, House of Frankenstein (1944), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review.

Today’s movie is the campy good House of Frankenstein (1944). This movie brings together so many good actors and the monsters they played it can’t help but be entertaining. Also this movie has some interesting lore about stake pulling and who can shot you with a silver bullet.

ACTORS

I’m going to jump right in with the actors were have previously discussed. The greatest of these is the wonderful Boris Karloff played the role of the evil want to be Frankenstein Doctor Gustav Niemann. Karloff was first introduced in Episode 7 – Continue reading

Boris Karloff – King of the Monsters

Boris Karloff on set taking a tea and toast break

I don’t think I will get much argument if I say that Boris Karloff was the greatest Frankenstein of them all. Although Peter Boyle was pretty good.

Karloff was a British actor that began stage work in Canada and then made his way to Hollywood. He made some silent films but had to maintain jobs such as ditch digger to survive. By 1931 Karloff was on his way with The Criminal Code (1931) and Five Star Final (1931), a film that was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Of course, the biggest role of all was that of the monster in Frankenstein (1931). Karloff was about 5 feet 11 inches. The costume that he work for this role had 4-inch platforms and weighed 8 pounds each. Karloff’s costume was designed by Jack Pierce and was copyrighted by Universal Studios making it harder for other studios to copy the success of Frankenstein. Oddly Lon Chaney Sr, father of Wolf Man Lon Chaney Jr. Was offer the role of … Continue reading

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) – Episode 21

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) is a Hammer Production is a sequel to the Curse of Frankenstein (1957). Peter Cushing is good in the low horror horror-flick.

Rough Script

Welcome to Episode 21 The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958). This movie puts us on the Lionel Jeffries line for a bit. Well, I have to tell you this movie wasn’t about much. It lagged and dragged from the beginning and seems to have never had the power to scare. But I will endeavor to preserver. Did you get that Josie Wales reference?

This movie is a sequel to The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) which was a reboot of the original story by Mary Shelley. The film was shot in a studio following Dracula (1958). This movie also starred Peter Cushing and had the same director. The scenes and props were repurposed for both movies.

Sir Peter Cushing played Dr. Victor Frankenstein in three different incarnations. Given the caliber of this actor, I expected more. Cushing is an English actor … Continue reading

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943) – Episode 10

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

I wanted to get one more show out in October and boy is it a Duesy. I haven’t seen this movie in a couple of decades but man does it age well. This movie not only closes the October 2014 Frankenstein line, it intersects with the Patric Knowles line and puts us back on course for mid-November. Today’s film is Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943).

Lon Chaney, Jr. played the role of Lawrence Talbot and the Wolf Man. I don’t know if Chaney Jr. was the greatest actor ever or that was real pain that he shows in every scene. Chaney was the son of legendary actor Lon Chaney, of such films as The Phantom of the Opera (1925), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) and about another 160 movies. Juniors is perhaps best known for playing the role of Lennie in Of Mice and Men (1939).

Patric Knowles played Dr. Mannering. Knowles has 127 credits from 1932 to 1973. Knowles was cast as Frank Andrews in Continue reading

Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Episode 9

Boris Karloff on set taking a tea and toast break

Son of Frankenstein (1939) had some of the biggest stars of their time – Basil Rathbone, Bela Lugosi, and Boris Karloff.

Son of Frankenstein (1939)

Hello, today we are going to continue with the October 2014 Frankenstein line. Today’s film is Son of Frankenstein (1939). It is the last of the three Universal Pictures Frankenstein’s and in many ways may be the best of the three. Basil Rathbone was a much better actor than many of the others cast in this role. Bela Lugosi was amazing as Ygor both frightening and enthralling. His hands did half of his acting. Also, Karloff was able to spend more time upright as the monster and showed more of his range of emotions. They covered many of the problems like the exploding castle but fell short on the forgiveness of Dr. F.

Today’s first character is Basil Rathbone who played Baron Wolf von Frankenstein the son of Henry. Rathbone was born in South Africa, in 1892, but left as … Continue reading

October 2014 Frankenstein Bumper

Hear what’s coming in October from Classic Movie Reviews with Snark on the October 2014 Frankenstein Bumper. Spoiler – It’s four Frankenstein reviews.

October 2014 Frankenstein

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Young Frankenstein (1974) – Episode 8

Marty Feldmann as Igor in Young Frankenstein (1974)

Young Frankenstein 1974 a snarky movie review of this Mel Brooks classic.

Rough Script

Today I am continuing the October 2014 Frankenstein line with a real laugh out loud comedy. This movie that follows the Mary Shelly story in largely a parody of The Bride of Frankenstein (1935).

Young Frankenstein (1974). Directed by Mel Brooks and the screenplay written by Brooks and Wilder. Should I stop here? Have you heard enough to know it’s funny? If not you might not be familiar with Brooks and Wilder.

I guess I start with Brooks but I will never be able to do him justice. Brooks came up the late 50s/60s television writers rooms. The contacts and collaborations he experienced during this time help lay the foundations for his later directorial success. In 1982 Brooks’ production company created My Favorite Year which was loosely based on a meeting between Brooks and an aging Errol Flynn. The movie is pretty funny and Peter O’Toole is quite good as a has-been alcoholic actor. My Favorite … Continue reading

Bride of Frankenstein (1935) – Episode 7

Bride of Frankenstein

 

Today I am continuing with the second of the Franks which I believe to be the greatest of the three films made in the 1930s. The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) introduced us to the lighting haired mate of the monster and many other elements that will be clear to any fan of Young Frankenstein (1974).

The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) was directed by James Whale. Whale was born in England and began producing plays while he was in a German POW camp during WWI. Whale had 23 directing credits including The Man in the Iron Mask (1939), Show Boat (1936),  The Invisible Man (1933), Frankenstein (1931), Hell’s Angels (1930) (uncredited) working with Howard Hughes. A great quote of Whales is “A director must be pretty bad if he can’t get a thrill out of war, murder, robbery.”

Actors

The first actor that will discuss is Boris Karloff. Boris Karloff who was billed in this movie as just Karloff. I don’t think I will get much argument if … Continue reading