Three lessons from King Kong (1933)

King Kong (1933)

Three lessons from King Kong (1933) I love King Kong (1933) it is a wonderful stop-motion monster movie that set the standards for all future monster movies. The movie has been remade in 1976 And 2005. There are three lessons from King Kong (1933) that can be learned from watching this movie. The first of these is to realistically access your place in the world. Kong was clearly the King of his island. He had dancing fans that regularly sacrificed to him. In New York City he was just another chump. Let me put it another way. If you are a blowfish and Hootie wants to make a country album, you make a country album. Now King Kong never made the choice to leave his island, but he became the classic small fish in a big pond in New York City. Lesson – Make a realistic assessment of yourself. When Kong broke free he focused on finding the woman that he was in love with and not getting back to…

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Bruce Cabot Bio

King Kong 1933 Movie Lineage

Bruce Cabot Bruce Cabot is well known to you whether you know it or not. Moving from a leading man to a sidekick role Cabot became a regular feature in most John Wayne movies such as The Comancheros (1961), Hatari! (1962), McLintock! (1963), In Harm’s Way (1965), The War Wagon (1967), The Green Berets (1968), Hellfighters (1969), The Undefeated (1969), Chisum (1970), and Big Jake (1971), a movie that has more quotable lines than an episode of Game of Thrones. Cabot became Wayne’s on-screen and off-screen drink buddy. Bruce Cabot was the leading man and hero in King Kong (1933) but somehow he never made the transition to leading man. Bruce Cabot auditioned for the role of The Ringo Kid in Stagecoach (1939). John Wayne was eventually cast in the John Ford western and became on of the most important actors in Hollywood. Bruce Cabot was reduced to supporting roles from then on out. This clearly illustrated the main point of On Any Given Sunday when Al Pacino gives the life…

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Fay Wray – actress who drove the big ape crazy

Fay Wray

Fay Wray, was a Canadian born actress that played the love interest in westerns during the silent years but made the transition to talkies. Fay stated that director Cooper said he would cast her with the tallest dark haired leading man in Hollywood. Wray though he was talking about Clark Gable. Of course he was refereeing to the 25 foot tall ape (King Kong 1931). Peter Jackson asked Wray to do a cameo in King Kong (2005). Wray said no as her Kong was the real one. Ms. Wray died before Jackson started shooting the new film. Actor Jack Black as Carl Denham paid tribute to Wray by saying he hired Ann Darrow because Wray was not available. Selected Films King Kong (1933) Fay stated that director Cooper said he would cast her with the tallest dark haired leading man in… Click To Tweet

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King Kong (1933) – 1

King Kong (1933)

  For my first movie review, I am taking on the king of them all – King Kong (1933). This is the king, see what I did there, of all monster movies and set the bar for what was to come. This movie used innovative techniques such as glass paintings, miniature sets, rear projection, traveling mattes, full-scale articulated creatures, and stop-motion photography to layer the action.[1] [2] [3] When this movie was shown in 1933, the audiences had never seen anything like it. This movie has been remade many times, 1976, 2005, 2017, and many variations of the story. Although some are visually striking, none has matched the original. If I say King Kong and you think of the 1976 or the 2005 version, or even the 2017 version, you clearly have never seen a good copy of the 1933 version. I’m talking about the 1933 real King Kong, the one with bi-planes and Fay Wray. This is an American-made film in the monster/adventure genre. It was never nominated for…

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