The Born Losers (1967) – Episode 72

The Born Losers (1967)

Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follows the links to social media in the podcast show notes. Today’s movie is in the badassery genera and 60-70 youthful rebellion. So let’s jump right in to the first of the three released Billy Jack movies, The Born Losers (1967). Tom Laughlin, who played the role of Billy Jack also co-wrote, and directed and produced under another name. I would say he was “invested.”

Tom Laughlin was born in Wisconsin in 1931. He played football in college and was later trained in Hapkido karate. Laughlin’s first movie role was as a beaten football player on a plane with James Cagney in the These Wilder Years (1956). He was a moderately successful actor appearing in such films as South Pacific (1958) and Gidget (1959). He really made a mark when he started producing his own movies in the Billy Jack series. The character, Billy Jack, was first introduced in …

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Hard Times (1975) – Episode 17

Charles Bronson in Hard Times (1975)

Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as a bare-knuckle fighter in New Orleans during the Great Depression. This movie also features James Coburn and Strother Martin in what may be his strongest role.

Rough Script

Welcome to Episode 17. Continuing on the

Strother Martin line today’s subject is the 1975 movie Hard Times (1975).

Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as Chaney a tuff as nails fighter with no background and very few words. In this entire movie, Bronson only speaks about 500 words. Bronson was around 53 when he took this role. The producers wanted a younger man and Jan-Michael Vincent was considered. However, Bronson was perfect for the role and was in great shape.

Bronson was born in Pennsylvania to Lithuanian parents. As a result of his upbringing he could speak several languages fluently. He also worked in the coal mines where he was in a tunnel collapse resulting in a lifelong fear of closed spaces. This fear and his languages were integrated into his …

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