The Horse Soldiers (1959) – 126

The Horse Soldiers (1959)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Horse Soldiers (1959). This movie was directed by John Ford and features his visual styling. The story is military, but the real issue is between, the mission-oriented commander, played by John Wayne and a doctor, more concerned with lifesaving, played by William Holden. The movie is based on a real Civil War raid that took place as a part of General Grant’s campaign to capture Vicksburg and control the Mississippi River. There are a lot of show veterans, so, let’s jump right in. Actors Returning The single-minded Union Commander Col. John Marlowe was played by John Wayne. John Wayne was first covered way back in Episode 2 – Chisum (1970). William Holden was…

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Strother Martin – Character Actor with Profound Impact

Strother Martin in Cool Hand Luke (1967)

Strother Martin Short Biography Strother Martin while famous for that line and many others, he was a springboard champion, taught swimming in the Navy during WWII, and missed the 1948 Olympic team by one place. He moved to Hollywood and among other things, was a swimming instructor to Charles Chaplin’s children. After meeting Sam Peckinpah he began to get roles like Cool Hand Luke (1967), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), Slap Shot (1977), and The Wild Bunch (1969). Strother Douglas Martin, Jr. (March 26, 1919 – August 1, 1980) was a character actor who often worked with John Wayne and Paul Newman. Many of his memorable western films were directed by John Ford and Sam Peckinpah. He is no doubt best known as the prison “captain” in Cool Hand Luke (1967), where he utters the famous line “What we’ve got here is failure to communicate.” This line is ranked number 11 on the American Film Institute list 100 Years…100 Movie Quotes. As a youth, he was very good…

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The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) – Episode 66

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence (1962)

Welcome to today’s show, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) is a great western movie. It shows the struggle between the open range cattle barons and the new town folks looking to have a quiet life. The cast for this movie is outstanding in terms of modern western. But it is an amazing cast by any standard. I’ll run through the actors we have seen before first. These include: John Wayne played the role of a tough western rancher named Tom Doniphon. John Wayne was first featured in Episode 2 –Chisum (1970) and yes in this movie he…

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World Without End (1956) – Episode 28

World Without End (1956)

  World Without End (1956) is an excellent post-apocalyptic sci-fi tale with a great cast that includes Hugh Marlowe, Rod Taylor, and Lisa Montell. Rough Script – World Without End (1956) I didn’t expect much when I began watching this movie but it is pretty solid piece of sci-fi. I was originally drawn to watch this movie because it stared Hugh Marlowe, one of the great actors of black and white sci-fi. We are linking off an actor that was uncredited in this film – Strother Martin from Episode 17 Hard Times (1975). The title of this film comes from an Anglican doxology: “Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit; as it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.” This film was produced by Allied Artists (formerly Monogram Pictures). They hoped to shed their third rate image. This film had a large budget, was shot in color, and had CinemaScope. The movie opened on a double bill…

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Hard Times (1975) – Episode 17

Charles Bronson in Hard Times (1975)

Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as a bare-knuckle fighter in New Orleans during the Great Depression. This movie also features James Coburn and Strother Martin in what may be his strongest role. Welcome to Episode 17. Continuing on the Strother Martin line today’s subject is the 1975 movie Hard Times (1975). Hard Times (1975) features Charles Bronson as Chaney a tuff as nails fighter with no background and very few words. In this entire movie, Bronson only speaks about 500 words. Bronson was around 53 when he took this role. The producers wanted a younger man and Jan-Michael Vincent was considered. However, Bronson was perfect for the role and was in great shape. Bronson was born in Pennsylvania to Lithuanian parents. As a result of his upbringing, he could speak several languages fluently. He also worked in the coal mines where he was in a tunnel collapse resulting in a lifelong fear of closed spaces. This fear and his languages were integrated into his roles in The Great Escape…

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McLintock! (1963) – Episode 3

McLintock! (1963)

  Today’s movie McLintock! (1963) continues the Bruce Cabot line from King Kong (1933) with a review of the McLintock! (1963) which is a classic John Wayne cowboy flick. This review goes over the major characters and give a plot summary with SPOILERS. It also give a final summary of the movie. I could switch to the John Wayne stream but I’m going to stick with Bruce Cabot for a while since he is in a number of Wayne movies that I want to cover anyway. I just didn’t think I would get here this soon. Eventually I will make it back to classic black and white horror films and other assorted genres. Today I going to talk about the 1963 John Wayne movie that, on the surface, seems like just a simple western comedy. But the truth is a little stranger. Marion Robert Morrison–known to most of us as John Wayne–AKA The Duke–starred as George Washington ‘G.W.’ McLintock. Over the span of 50 years, The Duke has 181 acting credits from…

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