Three lessons from King Kong (1933)

King Kong (1933)

King Kong (1933)

Three lessons from King Kong (1933)

Three lessons from King Kong (1933)

I love King Kong (1933) it is a wonderful stop-motion monster movie that set the standards for all future monster movies. The movie has been remade in 1976 And 2005.

There are three lessons from King Kong (1933) that can be learned from watching this movie. The first of these is to realistically access your place in the world. Kong was clearly the King of his island. He had dancing fans that regularly sacrificed to him. In New York City he was just another chump. Let me put it another way. If you are a blowfish and Hootie wants to make a country album, you make a country album. Now King Kong never made the choice to leave his island, but he became the classic small fish in a big pond in New York City. Lesson – Make a realistic assessment of yourself.

When Kong broke free he focused on finding the woman that he was in love with and not getting back to Skull Island (see above). It’s okay to fall in love but don’t lose your head. If you find yourself throwing buses or climbing building because your love has got you head messed up, it is time to move one. Besides how would it work out for a country boy and a big city girl, not well. Lesson – Fall in love, but don’t fall too far.

Just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should do it. The film crew, and Carl Denham, specifically had the capability to capture King Kong and take him back to New York City. For some reason, they had loads of knockout gas. But should they have captured the big ape? Did its work out fine for everyone involved? Denham – no, it broke his company. Kong – no, shot off a building by bi-planes. Ann Darrow – maybe, but will they blame her for what her boyfriend did? Lesson – Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.

Did you enjoy the Three lessons from King Kong (1933); if so you can buy King Kong (1933) on DVD here.

 

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JEC

I am s a professional archaeologist, a bonsai guy, a classic movie reviewer, and SQL pro.

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