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National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989) – 137

National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation (1989)

;nbsp; Welcome to today’s show, National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast formally known as iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989). This movie is so funny and accurate I almost can’t stand it. This movie was written by John Hughes but he turned the directing over Jeremiah S. Chechik. We only have a couple of show veterans and a lot of new actors. I am only going to cover about half the people in this film to keep it from being a hour long. Sorry about that. Actors Returning Brian Doyle-Murray played the uncaring boss Frank Shirley.  Brian was covered in Episode 96 – Scrooged (1988). E.G. Marshall played Art, Ellen’s father. Marshall was covered in Episode 68 –…

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Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964) – 136

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast formally known as iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964). This movie is a beloved holiday classic that has been shown every year since it was released. I ain’t good at math but that like 54 years. There is some really interesting trivia associated with this movie. Robert L. May created the character of Rudolph for a Montgomery Ward marketing campaign in 1939. That same year, his brother-in-law, Johnny Marks, wrote the song. Marks took the reindeer names from a public domain poem, “A Visit from St. Nicholas” which is the stockings were and hung and not a creature was stirring poem. Not the first to record the song, country singer Gene Autry…

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The Prowler (1951) – 135

The Prowler (1951)

  Welcome to today’s show, The Prowler (1951), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast formally known as iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Prowler (1951). This Film Noir crime drama starred Van Heflin and Evelyn Keyes. The role for Keyes was said to be a divorce present from her ex-husband Director John Huston.[1] This will be a great film to finish our #Noirvember fest with. An uncredited New York Times movie review upon release said the film was “Surreptitious amour, a rich legacy, and a murder have been pyramided into an impressive drama.”[2] iMDB.com rates this movie at 7.3 while Rotten Tomatoes has it at 100%.[3] This movie was directed by Joseph Losey. The screenplay was written by blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo and came out under his working…

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Mr. Novak: An Acclaimed Television Series – by Chuck Harter

Chuck Harter Mr. Novak

Mr. Novak: An Acclaimed Television Series 2017 by Chuck Harter The television series “Mr. Novak” 1963-1965 was a pivotal show in terms setting a template for later shows that features a core cast, with talented guest stars, and dealt with relevant social issues. “Mr. Novak” departed from the strict comedy format of shows like “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” 1959-1963 and set the stage for socially based drama like “Room 222” 1969-1974 and “The White Shadow” 1978-1981. Chuck Harter’s incredibly detailed book provides a complete history of “Mr. Novak” and its place in history. When I began reading this book, I was immediately struck by how the show was a training ground for a generation of actors such as Walter Koenig, Beau Bridges, Tony Dow, Mark Slade, Kim Darby, Shelley Fabares, and Don Grady. The show was anchored by veteran actors James Franciscus, Dean Jagger, and later Burgess Meredith. Many of the show’s cast contributed input into Mr. Harter’s book and give an in-depth background that is rarely seen.…

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The Harder They Fall (1956) – 134

The Harder They Fall (1956)

  Welcome to today’s show, The Harder They Fall (1956), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast formally known as iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Harder They Fall (1956). This is a gritty boxing Film-Noir without a serious femme fatale. This movie was Humphrey Bogart last film. Rod Steiger led a vicious crew of gangsters. Real boxers rounded out the crew. Mark Robson directed this tale of corruption and betrayal in the sweet science. We have three veteran actors and several new ones. Actors Returning Humphrey Bogart played a sports writer that had fallen on hard times, Eddie Willis. The great Humphrey Bogart was covered in Episode 25 – Sahara (1943). Jan Sterling played the devoted and sweet wife of Eddie, Beth Willis. Sterling was covered in…

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The Garment Jungle (1957) – 133

The Garment Jungle (1957)

  Welcome to today’s show, The Garment Jungle (1957), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast formally known as iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Garment Jungle (1957). This movie is a gritty Film-Noir crime story that is great for our #Noirvember celebration. The only reason I took a look at this movie is because of Robert Loggia. But with Lee J. Cobb, Gia Scala, and Richard Boone, it turned out to be a pretty solid movie, with a decent plot. This movie is rated at 6.6 on iMDB.com.[1] The movie has a 64 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[2] I feel it’s a little better than the ratings. The movie was directed by Robert Aldrich but Vincent Sherman took over in the end. Aldrich is uncredited. Glenn Erickson[3]…

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Fallen Angel (1945) -132

Fallen Angel (1945)

  Welcome to today’s show, Fallen Angel (1945), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. This Film Noir is rated 7.2 by iMDB.com1 and 80 percent by Rotten Tomatoes2. This film was directed by Otto Preminger. I really liked it, as Dana Andrews is great as a tough guy. Linda Darnell is beautiful and elusive. The supporting players, Charles Bickford, John Carradine, Percy Kilbride, Anne Revere, Alice Faye, and to a lesser degree even Bruce Cabot were all great at weaving this whodunit. The critics of the era seemed to be looking for another Laura (1944), but how often can director Otto Preminger or any director pull one of those off. Bosley Crowther, of The New York Times, thought the acting and story was below par.3 Today’s movie is…

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The Mummy’s Curse (1944) – 130

The Mummy’s Curse (1944)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast AKA iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you’re finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Mummy’s Curse (1944). This is the third time that Long Chaney Jr. played the mummy. I wanted to pan this movie like the rest of this mummy series, but I found this one to be vastly superior to the other three. With limited star power, the acting was still very solid. I thought that moving mummy from a swamp in Massachusetts to Louisiana would be ridiculous but the folklore was woven into the story very well. With that said, any of you that have been listening for a while know that English is not my native language. Since I was raised in raise in a third world country known as…

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The Mummy’s Ghost (1944) – 129

The Mummy's Ghost (1944)

  Welcome to today’s show, The Mummy’s Ghost (1944), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast formally known as iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. This movie is similar to The Mummy’s Tomb (1942) with a couple of better actors like John Carradine and Barton MacLane. The movie has a 33 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[1] However, the plot has a Mack truck size hole in it. Did they even watch the earlier movies before they slapped this together? Anyway, it is a fun watch and I really enjoyed seeing the young John Carradine. So, I’ll jump right into the show veterans, of which there are a few. Actors Returning Lon Chaney Jr. is returning in the role of Kharis AKA the mummy. Chaney was first covered in Episode 5 – Of…

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The Mummy’s Tomb (1942) – 128

The Mummy’s Tomb (1942)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Mummy’s Tomb (1942). The Mummy’s Tomb (1942) continues the story of The Mummy’s Hand (1940) some thirty years later. There’s not much of a story here and a large portion of the movie is clips from The Mummy (1932) and The Mummy’s Hand (1940). While sporting only a 29% rating on Rotten Tomatoes[1], it is fun late night classic horror fare. So, let’s jump into the show veterans and clip veterans. Actors Returning Lon Chaney Jr. assumed the role of Kharis/The Mummy. Chaney was first covered in Episode 5 – Of Mice and Men (1939). Wallace Ford returned as Babe, but this time Hanson instead of Jansen. Ford was covered in Episode…

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The Mummy’s Hand (1940) -127

The Mummy’s Hand (1940)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Mummy’s Hand (1940). This movie is sometimes called the sequel to The Mummy (1932). However, it doesn’t as much continue the story, as it uses clips from the earlier film woven into another story to save money. This movie is not too bad as early horror films go. Any movie that has three archeologists can’t be all bad. Of course, one of the three is evil, which I find to be pretty consistent with my life experience. This movie is rated 67% on Rotten Tomatoes.[1] At the time of release, the New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote “Once or twice Miss Moran makes a grimace—as if she had caught an…

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The Horse Soldiers (1959) – 126

The Horse Soldiers (1959)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Horse Soldiers (1959). This movie was directed by John Ford and features his visual styling. The story is military, but the real issue is between, the mission-oriented commander, played by John Wayne and a doctor, more concerned with lifesaving, played by William Holden. The movie is based on a real Civil War raid that took place as a part of General Grant’s campaign to capture Vicksburg and control the Mississippi River. There are a lot of show veterans, so, let’s jump right in. Actors Returning The single-minded Union Commander Col. John Marlowe was played by John Wayne. John Wayne was first covered way back in Episode 2 – Chisum (1970). William Holden was…

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Blood Money (1933) – 125

Blood Money (1933)

  Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is Blood Money (1933). This is my first go at an honest to goodness pre-code movie. I was telling one of my co-workers about this film and after a bit, she said when do the rabbits come in? I was pretty confused until she told me she thought the title was Blood Bunny. I am pretty excited to record this podcast for two reasons: 1) We all survived Hurricane Irma, and 2) I have wanted to do it ever since I was researching Episode 42 – I Walked With a Zombie (1943) and I heard Frances Dee’s quote about a friend admonished her for playing a prostitute in Blood Money (1933), and she replied,…

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