James Cagney – Tough Guy, Dancer

One, Two, Three (1961) - James Cagney

The word great is thrown around a lot, but with this guy, it’s true. James Cagney was a real tough guy and a song and dance man as well. James Cagney, of course, was born in New York City in 1899. After high school, he attended Columbia University but left school upon his father’s death in the 1918 flu pandemic. James Cagney had a variety of jobs bellhop and night doorman. He learned to tap dance, was a street brawler, and was a good amateur boxer. His mother encouraged his boxing but refused to let him turn pro. James Cagney, who began working behind the scenes in theater, was called one night to replace his sick brother and thus began his acting career. He began working on Broadway and in Vaudeville. In 1924, he and his wife moved to California. But they had no luck and headed back to New York. James Cagney was in a play title “Maggie the Magnificent” with actress Joan Blondell. Al Jolson brought the right…

Continue reading

The Garment Jungle (1957) – 133

The Garment Jungle (1957)

  Welcome to today’s show, The Garment Jungle (1957), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast formally known as iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Today’s movie is The Garment Jungle (1957). This movie is a gritty Film-Noir crime story that is great for our #Noirvember celebration. The only reason I took a look at this movie because of Robert Loggia. But with Lee J. Cobb, Gia Scala, and Richard Boone, it turned out to be a pretty solid movie, with a decent plot. This movie is rated at 6.6 on iMDB.com.[1] The movie has a 64 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[2] I feel it’s a little better than the ratings. The movie was directed by Robert Aldrich but Vincent Sherman took over in the end. Aldrich is uncredited. Glenn Erickson[3] stated: Depending…

Continue reading

Tarzan Syndrome

Tarzan Syndrome

The Tarzan Syndrome is when any newcomer arrives in a location or culture and has an overblown effect on the locals and their cultural interactions. Origins – He [Chris Rock] decries the business’s preference for what he calls “Tarzan movies,” films in which a naive, poor black character is “discovered” by whites and finally wins over mainstream society with a combination of their help and his own street smarts. “People do what works and no black actor has ever worked better than Eddie Murphy,” Rock says. “So a movie like ‘Trading Places’ is great, when you do it on the highest level, with Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd and John Landis at their peak. But if you do a cheap version of it, you really have something that’s not so cool. New York Daily News Tarzan Syndrome

Continue reading