Dracula (1931) and Drácula (1931) – Episode 86

Dracula (1931)

Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. Today’s movie is the classic Universal horror film Dracula (1931). Many of you are probably aware that a Spanish-language version was filmed on the same sets and at the same time as the English-language with Bela Lugosi (1931). They filmed the English-language version during the day and the Spanish-language version was filmed at night. The only difference in title is that the Spanish version has a little mark above the first “a.” In my opinion, the Spanish-language version is vastly superior to the Lugosi film. I realize this is heresy and Bela Lugosi will always be the only vampire for me. They just…

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Mark of the Vampire (1935) – Episode 64

Carroll Borland - Mark of the Vampire (1935)

Welcome to today’s show, Mark of the Vampire (1935), my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts. Remember this show is completely free and independent. All I ask is that you jump over to iTunes and give me a review. Mark of the Vampire (1935) is a great movie. Bela Lugosi is great as always but the stand out performance of this movie is really Carroll Borland as the vampiress Luna. We will get to her in a bit but first I want to briefly touch on the four actors were have seen before. This movie is a remake of the silent London After Midnight (1927) starring Lon Chaney Sr. ACTORS Lionel Barrymore played the role of investigator Professor Zelin. We introduced Barrymore in Episode 25 – Key Largo (1948). Of course Bela Lugosi played the vampire…

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Bela Lugosi leaves rehab in 1955

Bela Lugosi leaves rehab and talks about his alcohol and drug addiction after leaving rehab in 1955 Bela Lugosi leaves rehab and talks frankly about his struggles with narcotics and alcohol. It is interesting that he doesn’t blame his World War I wound as the source of the pain. Lugosi was injured while an officer in the military of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. I like it when Bela Lugosi refers to Eddy Woods. Lugosi continued to struggle after this and was using narcotics at the time of his death.   Although weighing only 125 pounds and only a shadow of his former self, Lugosi’s voice was clear and resonant as he told the court how shooting pains in his legs led him to start taking morphine injections in 1935. Without morphine, he couldn’t work, Lugosi said. Read more here in the transcript Bela Lugosi Short Biography

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Zombies on Broadway (1945) – Episode 41

Zombies on Broadway (1945)

Zombies on Broadway (1945) is a tongue in cheek comedy that is way out of date. However, it features Bela Lugosi and zombies so it must be watched. Rough Script – Zombies on Broadway (1945) Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follows the links to social media in the podcast show notes. Today we are looking at first of our 2015 horror movies. Episode 41 – Zombies on Broadway (1945) is a comedy. Surprise. I have the feeling that this episode will be way on the short side. This movie ain’t about much. It does have some serious racial stereotyping. However, it has a few stars and a couple of actors that will show up in future podcasts. So let jump right in and start going over the comic talent. Wally Brown and Alan Carney were a movie comedy duo that was active from 1943-1946. Brown stayed a bit player in movies while Carney had a few…

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Bela Lugosi – King of the Vampires

Bela Lugosi was born Be’la Ferenc Dezso Blasko in 1882 in Lugos, Austria-Hungary (now Lugoj, Romania). During WWI Lugosi was an infantry lieutenant in the Austro-Hungarian Army. Yes, that is correct, it’s the other side. Since he was active in the Actors Union during the Hungarian Revolution of 1919 he was forced to leave his homeland. For a time he continued to act in Berlin but left for America in 1920. he arrived in New Orleans in December 1920. This makes me wonder, where the rats disappearing on the boat and did he mingle with the Crescent city vampires. After working on the stage for three years he got his first silent screen role in America, he had been in a dozen or so in Hungary. By 1927, he was back on Broadway in the role of “Dracula.” It has always been rumored the Lon Chaney Sr. was the first choice for the role but died before shooting began. There is some controversy with this a Chaney was under contract…

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White Zombie (1932) – Episode 20

Bela Lugosi in White Zombie (1932)

White Zombie (1932) is an amazing black and white horror classic. Bela Lugosi is phenomenal as “Murder” the lord of the zombies. This is one film you do not want to miss as they weave an interesting tale around zombie lore in Haiti. Rough Script White Zombie (1932) Believe it or not this was the first time I have ever seen White Zombie (1932) and all I can say is why did I wait so long. As far as I’m concerned this is right up there with Dracula and Frankenstein. The movie was not received well when it was first released but has gained in popularity since its’ rediscovery in the 1960s. The band White Zombie was named for this movie. This film was originally shot in 11 days. Bela Lugosi always regretted that he was only paid $500 for this role. Lugosi is amazing with his pointed widow’s peak, very bushy eyebrows, a split mustache, and a goatee. He uses his Dracula stare to great effect in this movie. They…

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Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943) – Episode 10

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

I wanted to get one more show out in October and boy is it a Duesy. I haven’t seen this movie in a couple of decades but man does it age well. This movie not only closes the October 2014 Frankenstein line, it intersects with the Patric Knowles line and puts us back on course for mid-November. Today’s film is Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943). Lon Chaney, Jr. played the role of Lawrence Talbot and the Wolf Man. I don’t know if Chaney Jr. was the greatest actor ever or that was real pain that he shows in every scene. Chaney was the son of legendary actor Lon Chaney, of such films as The Phantom of the Opera (1925), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) and about another 160 movies. Juniors is perhaps best known for playing the role of Lennie in Of Mice and Men (1939). Patric Knowles played Dr. Mannering. Knowles has 127 credits from 1932 to 1973. Knowles was cast as Frank Andrews in The Wolf…

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Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Episode 9

Boris Karloff on set taking a tea and toast break

Son of Frankenstein (1939) had some of the biggest stars of their time – Basil Rathbone, Bela Lugosi, and Boris Karloff. Son of Frankenstein (1939) Hello, today we are going to continue with the October 2014 Frankenstein line. Today’s film is Son of Frankenstein (1939). It is the last of the three Universal Pictures Frankenstein’s and in many ways may be the best of the three. Basil Rathbone was a much better actor than many of the others cast in this role. Bela Lugosi was amazing as Ygor both frightening and enthralling. His hands did half of his acting. Also, Karloff was able to spend more time upright as the monster and showed more of his range of emotions. They covered many of the problems like the exploding castle but fell short on the forgiveness of Dr. F. Today’s first character is Basil Rathbone who played Baron Wolf von Frankenstein the son of Henry. Rathbone was born in South Africa, in 1892, but left as a forthcoming Boer War. In…

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The Wolf Man (1941) – Episode 6

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

  To get back to this classic horror flick I am creating a new line from Patric Knowles who was in Chisum (1970) to The Wolf Man (1941). There are a few biggies down this line that I want to get to. Even a man who is pure at heart, and says his prayers by night, may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the autumn moon is bright. Even a man who is pure at heart, and says his prayers by night, may become a wolf when the wolfbane… Click To Tweet This beautiful little poem recited several times in The Wolf Man (1941) is said to have Eastern European folk roots. However, Curt Siodmak wrote it for this film and has joined the werewolf lore along with many other elements from this movie. The poem, be it somewhat change was quoted in Van Helsing (2004) as well as in every Universal film Wolf Man appearances. I’m going to Patric Knowles line from Chisum (1970) to get to this movie.…

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