Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956) – 102

Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956)

 

Welcome to today’s show, my name is John. As always you can subscribe to the show on iTunes or follow the links to social media in the podcast show notes. So please subscribe when you are finished listening.  You can also go to snarkymoviereviews.com to read notes, bios, and other random movie thoughts.

Today’s movie is Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956). It is one of those great old black and white UFO films that came out when American was trying to understand the Cold War between the USA and USSR and fearing total nuclear annihilation. Kind of like 2017! In this film, aliens contact an Earth scientist as part of a plot to enslave the Earth’s population. But he is the one guy they should have left alone.

This movie has some really iconic scenes, such as a UFO crashing into and destroying the Washington Monument. These great effects were created by the special effects wizard Ray Harryhausen. Harryhausen said in his biography that this was … Continue reading

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) – Episode 30

The Birdman of Alcatraz (1962)

The Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) is a fictionalized tale of Robert Stroud who raised birds while in prison and discovered cures for bird diseases. This movie showcases the amazing talent of Burt Lancaster. Karl Malden is excellent in the supporting role.

Rough Script Birdman of Alcatraz (1962)

Today’s film is the Birdman of Alcatraz (1962). This is a wonderfully inspiring story based on a true story that makes you say “thank god that guy is locked up.” This movie was directed by John Frankenheimer and based on a book by Thomas E. Gaddis.

Of course, the Birdman was brought to life by arguably one of America’s greatest actors – Burt Lancaster. Even that name sounds macho. Lancaster played the role of Robert Stroud a lifer in a couple of different prisons.

Lancaster was born in Manhattan. All four of his grandparents were immigrants from Northern Ireland. Lancaster grew up on the streets and was a tuff character. He became interested in gymnastics and was a high school athlete. Following his … Continue reading

Hugh Marlowe Short Bio

Hugh Marlowe with Gregory Peck Twelve O'Clock High (1949) Military tribute fest

Hugh Marlowe was born in Pennsylvania in 1911. Marlowe had a radio, stage, and film career. I will confine myself to just the films at this point.

Marlow began his stage career in the early 1930’s at the Pasadena Playhouse in California. His first appeared on the New York stage in a 1936 production of  ”Arrest That Woman.”

Marlowe’s best work was in sci-fi. Marlowe’s first film was Married Before Breakfast (1937). His films included Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), Twelve O’Clock High (1949) as a critical character in this fine story along with Gregory Peck, All About Eve (1950), Night and the City (1950), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Rawhide (1951), Howard Hawks’ Monkey Business (1952), Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956) as the lead Earth scientist, World Without End (1956), Elmer Gantry (1960), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) and Seven Days in May (1964).

When Marlowe’s film days were over he was on the soap opera “Another World” from 1969 until his death in … Continue reading

World Without End (1956) – Episode 28

World Without End (1956)

 

World Without End (1956) is an excellent post-apocalyptic sci-fi tale with a great cast that includes Hugh Marlowe, Rod Taylor, and Lisa Montell.

Rough Script – World Without End (1956)

I didn’t expect much when I began watching this movie but it is pretty solid piece of sci-fi. I was originally drawn to watch this movie because it stared Hugh Marlowe, one of the great actors of black and white sci-fi. We are linking off an actor that was uncredited in this film – Strother Martin from Episode 17 Hard Times (1975).

The title of this film comes from an Anglican doxology: “Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit; as it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.”

This film was produced by Allied Artists (formerly Monogram Pictures). They hoped to shed their third rate image. This film had a large budget, was shot in color, and had CinemaScope. The movie opened on a double … Continue reading